Uses of Photometers

Just to reiterate, photometers are used to measure light intensity. Photometers do so in the following ways. Illuminance Illuminance is the measure of the degree to which light illuminates a surface, and the wavelength is weighed luminosity function to compare it with the perception of the brightness witnessed by the eye. The human eye is used here because it was the first object that was used to determine the intensity and it can differentiate a broad range of light. Fluorescence Photometers help us to distinguish between materials that are fluorescent and those that aren’t. Fluorescent materials have absorbed light along…

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Incident-light photometers

These photometers use an incident-light meter that measures the amount of light falling on the subject. It is the most accurate of the five photometers. In around 1861, three different types of photometers were adopted for use then, and they are as follows;

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Spot photometers

Here, light readings are gotten from different areas of the subject being photographed, and then the photographer uses these readings so that he/she may know how to set the exposure of the camera for the studied areas.

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Color Photometers

Color photometers measure the amount of light falling on an object along with the intensity of color coming from it. Such photometers are used to balance out the saturation of color and are particularly useful when it comes to photography.

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What Is A Photometer And What Is It used for?

Photometry is the science that studying light, concerning its brightness. Photometry used to be done using the human eye until electric light sensitive tools like the photometer was invented. So what is a photometer and what is it used for? A photometer is a device used to measure diverse aspects of the intensity of light. The instrument is used in photography, soil testing, and the water industry. It is used to compare light transmitted from two sources, when the specific characteristics from one source are known and are standard and the other unknown. The photometer gives an accurate comparison of…

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Hope Can Be Learned: Setting Priorities for Change

Hope, according to Snyder, has a lot to do with prioritizing areas needing improvement, identifying possible ways to achieve goals, selecting routes and following those routes. A logical first step is to decide what things in life are most important to you, and then think about how satisfied you are with the current status of that area. An area of high importance but low satisfaction may be a good starting point. For example, if you rank Family as being #1 (most Important to you), but your relationship with your family members is currently quite poor (rating of 2 for Satisfaction),…

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Your Perceived Stress Score

Compare your score to the “Average” scores below. You may compare against people of your age or your gender. If you are more than six points above the “average” than you probably have a medium-high amount of stress, and if you are six points below than you are relatively stress free. If you are 12 points above the noted average score, than you likely are experiencing significantly high amounts of stress and may be endangering your health

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